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Science Meeting Series

The SFCC holds an on-going weekly meeting series to present a variety of topics to researchers and their staff. Topics include genetics, sharing journal articles of interest, work-in-progress updates, data analysis, and guest speakers. If you have questions, suggestions for topics, or would like to give a presentation, contact Christina Kouma.

When: Fridays, 1:00 pm
Where: Mission Hall, second floor conference room MH 2500 or MH 2700
Please contact us for entry to the suite.

To see our upcoming Lunch and Science schedule, please click here.

Recent News

Can proteins in your circulation rejuvenate your heart, brain, and muscles?

Posted May 2016

Led by Dr. Steve Cummings, the SFCC has been awarded a new and exciting translational grant from NIA to test whether proteins that circulate in our blood can rejuvenate older people and reduce their risk of dementia, heart failure, frailty and even extend healthy survival.

"High thyroid levels" may lead to frailty

Posted May 2016

In a study from MrOS from the SF Coordinating Center and led by Dr. Doug Bauer, we found that high levels of thyroid hormone that were not known to the patient or physician, indicated a 2.5 to 3.6 times greater chance of becoming frail later in life. This is a treatable condition that might lead to wasting bone and muscle.

(See abstract Virginii VS, et al. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and frailty among older men. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2015;100:4524-32.)

Can Hip BMD substitute for fractures in clinical trials?

Posted May 2016

Clinical trials of new drugs for the prevention of fracture are extremely expensive and typically go on for at least 3 years. Investigators have tried for decades to find a new more efficient way of conducting these trials more efficiently. The Foundation for NIH project on Bone Quality at the SFCC has discovered that hip BMD is a good surrogate for hip fracture in clinical trials.

Do you fall when your knee buckles?

Posted May 2016

Some older people are prone to fall if their knee begins to buckle under them. In a study of 1,843 older adults in the MOST Study, Dr. Mike Nevitt found that those who say they fall had a a 3 - 4.5 times greater chance of having numerous falls and injuries due to falls during the next 7 years! Perhaps leg strengthening exercise would reduce this tendency and prevent the consequences of falling - injury and fear of falling. Nevitt MC, et al. Soon to appear in Arthritis Care and Research, 2016.

Grant to study the long-term effects of bisphosphonates, particularly the occurrence of atypical femoral fractures (AFF)

Posted March 2016

Dr. Doug Bauer, a UCSF General Internist and SFCC member for over 25 years, recently received an NIH grant to study the long-term effects of bisphosphonates, particularly the occurrence of atypical femoral fractures (AFF) which appear to be more common after prolonged bisphosphonate use.

The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) has recently been funded by the NIA for a third round of examinations

Posted March 2016

The study will continue to following the existing cohort of 3,000 older men and women in Birmingham, AL and Iowa City, IA and will also recruit a new cohort of individuals less than age 70 who have early OA of the knee or who may develop it

High levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy, a mixture of normal and mutated mtDNA molecules in a cell, lead to inherited mitochondrial diseases

Posted March 2016

High levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy, a mixture of normal and mutated mtDNA molecules in a cell, lead to inherited mitochondrial diseases with neurological, sensory, and movement impairments. We measured mtDNA heteroplasmy at twenty disease-causing sites for associations with neurosensory and mobility function among elderly participants from a community-based study of aging.

Dennis Black's osteoporosis research featured in Wall Street Journal

Posted February 2016

The Wall Street Journal recently interviewed Dennis Black, professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, about his research regarding the efficacy of certain drugs for treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Black's work was published in January in the New England Journal of Medicine as a practice summary for practicing clinicians to help them understand when and how to screen and treat women showing symptoms of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The Wall Street Journal article focuses on Black's research regarding bisphosphates. Black's research shows the benefits of these drugs for treating osteoporosis outweigh the risks. You can read the Wall Street Journal article here (free to subscribers).

You can read the Wall Street Journal article here (free to subscribers).

The practice summary in the New England Journal of Medicine is available here.